Lyngbye’s Sedge  
Carex lyngbyei
n = 2
III.A.3.i.  Halophytic Sedge Wet Meadow
Ecosystem: Tidal

Lyngbye sedge (Carex lyngbyei) is a well known and described type  for Alaska.  It is listed in every Alaska classification that includes coastal ecosystems.

A monotypic stand of tall Lyngbye’s sedge dominates the upper tidally-influenced zone, where the shore is protected from surf. On the lowlands these sites are limited to protected areas such as the lagoon north of Nikiski, near the mouths of the larger streams, the Kenai and Kasilof River; and behind the Homer Spit.  

A Ramensk’s sedge (Carex ramenski) zone lies just seaward. Landward, pools with common mare’s tail (Hippuris vulgaris) and the rare plant (G4, S2S3, Natural Heritage Progam) Kamchatka spikerush (Eleocharis kamtschatica) lie below a zone of pacific silverweed (Argentina egedii) and goosetongue (Plantago maritima).  

On the Susitna Flats, Lyngbye's sedge principally occurs in Vince and Snow's (1984) 'Inner sedge marsh Zone 7', which floods a minimum of 0-4 times per summer (average = 2).  Organic material usually does not accumulate, although occasional inland stands are found with thick organic horizons.  On the coast, due to flooding frequency, these sites are always jurisdictional wetlands.  

Some inland sites have high Lyngbye’s sedge cover, usually mixed with other plants.  Lyngbye’s sedge does not necessarily require saltwater influence, but it is a good indicator of jurisdictional wetland conditions.

Table 1.  Summary of plant frequency and average cover for plants occurring in more than 50% of plots.

           Wetland Indicator Status

 Plant

f

 Average Cover

  Alaska National
Graminoid
Carex lyngbyei   1.0 97.5 OBL OBL
Open water 1.0 46.0      

 


 Introduction and Key to Plant Communities  

Introduction and Key to Ecosystems

    Kenai Hydric Soils    Map Unit Summary    Methods    Glossary


Contact: Mike Gracz
Kenai Watershed Forum 
PO Box 15301
Fritz Creek, AK  99603
907-235-2218
The Alaska Natural Heritage Program
Environment and Natural Resource Institute
University of Alaska, Anchorage
707 A Street, Suite 101
Anchorage, Alaska  99501

04 May 2007 09:38